Alberta Avenue Charm: Passion de France

Passion de France, a relatively new bakery located in the Eastwood neighbourhood, has remained somewhat under the radar since opening back in November. Perhaps because of its location just off the main Alberta Avenue drag, one wouldn’t likely stumble across Passion de France by accident.

Passion de France

Passion de France

I sought out the bakery after around lunch time last week after a meeting near by. Passion de France charms with its pastel colouring, chandeliers and ornate seating. For those seeking something more substantial, Passion de France does offer a variety of savoury items, including sandwiches, quiche and soup. But no doubt, they specialize in more dainty goods.

Passion de France

Interior

The pastry cases were filled with an astonishing variety given the bakery’s size, ranging from macarons, tarts, cakes and pies. Being a sucker for croissants, however, my attention was eventually diverted to their selection of flaky treats. They had already sold out of plain croissants that morning, and I couldn’t wait for their second batch to finish baking, so I ended up with a few mini pain au chocolat ($1.95), as well as croissant twists in chocolate and salted caramel flavours ($3.40 each).

The chocolate croissants were my favourite of the two; they definitely didn’t skimp on the butter! The salted caramel twist was a little too moist for my taste, reminding me of a Danish.

With friendly staff and an inviting interior, Passion de France would make a great stop for those looking to indulge their sweet tooth – I know I’ll be back for their croissants some time soon!

Passion de France
11812 86 Street
(780) 257-2092

Something Borrowed, Something New: Gama Cafe

Gama Café, tucked away on a side street in Old Strathcona, was known for their unique green cap milk tea, a Taiwanese specialty drink featuring cheese foam. The space, however, was divided between the café and retail, and eventually, the former seemed to outpace the latter.

Three weeks ago, Gama opened in brand new digs further west on Whyte Avenue, with décor more fitting of a café. There is now ample seating, with plenty of cushy, cozy booths, and even a semi-partitioned area ideal for larger groups. The crystal light fixtures definitely brought an air of elegance to the space, seemingly made for lingering over coffee with girlfriends or a casual first date.

Gama Cafe

Interior

Su had noticed the new storefront a week prior, and suggested it as our meeting point on Friday for a quick bite before another engagement in the neighbourhood. That evening, we were one of several parties, so the word has been spreading quickly about Gama’s transplanted location!

With a full kitchen, Gama can now work towards offering full lunch and dinner menus. However, at this time, savoury dishes are still under development, with only three on the current menu. Both Su and I agreed that we would have to return to sample some of their desserts – the table adjacent to us had ordered the Tommi Toast, which looked like a many layered cake topped with ice cream!

Gama Cafe

Latte

Su had decided on the porcini risotto ($13.99), while I chose the dry noodle ($12.99). The risotto arrived several minutes before the noodles, likely because the server assumed we were sharing. Although we both remarked that it seemed an odd fit for the café, the risotto was fine. The egg was perfectly poached however, and having not been referenced on the menu description, was a nice surprise.

Gama Cafe

Porcini risotto

The noodles had, in fact, been tossed in a very light, flavourful sauce. The accompaniments had been minimized to a few mushrooms. Although we were assured of its authentic nature (and found the noodles themselves to be quite tasty), I’d still prefer a dish with more texture and variants.

Gama Cafe

Dry noodles

Service was spotty, but understandable considering its recent opening. It may take some time for Gama to reach its full potential in its new state, but it is full of potential! I look forward to returning in the future to see what new surprises may await on the menu, or at least to satisfy my sweet tooth.

Gama Café
10813 82 Avenue
(780) 438-2382

Welcome to the Neighbourhood: District Coffee Co.

In a way, it’s fitting that the newest independent coffee shop to open in downtown Edmonton is called District Coffee Co. For a time, it was looking like the area around 104 Street and Jasper Avenue, with the trifecta of Credo, Transcend and Roast, was growing into the city’s premiere coffee district. Unfortunately, it didn’t last, and in 2013, we lost the latter two downtown. Perhaps with the herald of District Coffee Co., we will one day return to having an number of third wave cafes within walking distance of one another again.

District Coffee Co. is the brainchild of Nate Box, the proprietor of Elm Café and its growing catering arm. But unlike Elm Café’s Oliver storefront, District will be focusing on quality coffee and baked goods.

District Coffee Co.

Interior

Mack and I attended a friends and family event this afternoon, organized in anticipation of the café’s Monday, March 3, 2014 opening. The space has received a full makeover, including the installation of a long counter and ovens for the pastry staff.

District Coffee Co.

Assortment of pastries and truffles

The space has a limited number of seats, but I’d imagine the majority of District’s business will be grab and go. They are the first café to serve and offer Phil & Sebastian Coffee in Edmonton (our go-to roaster and café in Calgary), and will offer a small food menu including oatmeal, rice pudding, soup, salad, and pot pie. I sampled one of their addictive cinnamon buns, and satisfied my sweet tooth with their house made salted caramels.

District Coffee Co.

Phil & Sebastian Coffee

We also couldn’t leave without trying their lattes – smooth, creamy and of course, finished with latte art, you won’t be disappointed.

District Coffee Co.

We heart coffee!

We loved the little details too – like the antique brass date counter (set next to the iPad, naturally), and their set of Alberta collector spoons in place of the usual demitasse spoons.

District Coffee Co.District Coffee Co.

It is clear District is a labour of love. They are a welcome addition to the neighbourhood. Congrats to Nate and his team!

District Coffee Co.
#101, 10011 109 Street
(780) 705-7788
Monday-Friday 7am-5pm

The New Cheese on the Block: The Cavern

Since we moved into our condo on 104 Street nearly three years ago, we’ve seen some wonderful food-related additions to the block. Dauphine (formerly Queen of Tarts) in 2011 and Pangea (now much better stocked), Evoolution and Kelly’s Pub in 2012. Cask and Barrel, Roast and Mercer Tavern round out the Promenade.

On Tuesday, a cheese shop will join this growing list of establishments. The Cavern, located in the Phillips Lofts, will open its doors to the public on April 9. Mack and I were lucky enough to attend a private opening last Friday for a sneak peek.

The space formerly housed a swim shop, but walking in, not a single trace of its former occupant remained. Instead, we found an elegant space that elevates what can be expected of a subterranean storefront – a neutral but modern colour palette, gorgeous masonry that mimics the original brickwork and sparkling granite countertops.

The Cavern

The Cavern

The Cavern is first and foremost a cheese shop. Proprietor Tricia Bell has over 20 years of hospitality experience, but more recently, studied under the 2011 Cheesemonger of the Year, Steve Jones of The Cheese Bar in Portland, Oregon. It’s obvious that Tricia adores cheese; her enthusiasm was infectious as she described her cheeses having different “personalities” and “behaving differently”.

The Cavern

Cheese case

Tricia stocks a range of cheeses, but focuses on the middle range of cheeses that most people are familiar with. Regarding locally-made products, she currently stocks several varieties from Sylvan Star and The Cheesiry, and is working on bringing in Smokey Valley Goat Cheese as well. It is notable that The Cavern carefully packs cheese in a layer of Formaticum, a patented paper technology made of organic materials that helps to better preserve cheese.

Beyond the cheese counter, however, The Cavern will also offer food service. Without a full kitchen, the menu is limited, but their Cavern-inspired cheese, vegetarian and meat grilled sandwiches (which will feature Sylvan Star cheese) sound delicious. For dinner (after 5pm), they will serve cheese and charcuterie boards alongside wine and beer.

The Cavern

Cheese board

Tricia chose beans from Portland-based Coava Coffee Roasters for her coffee and espresso-based drinks, and will use Jacek chocolate in her mochas. She is also currently experimenting with desserts made with chocolate and cheese – a two ingredients not normally combined.

The Cavern

Coffee and chocolate

We’re already looking forward to visiting The Cavern this week for some nibbles and of course, to stock up on some cheese! Thanks again to Shauna for the invitation, and to Tricia for having us!

The Cavern
2, 10169 104 Street
(780) 455-1336
Monday-Thursday 7am-8pm, Friday and Saturday 7am-11pm, Sunday 10am-5pm

Portland: Morning Meals

Most mornings in Portland, Mack and I did not indulge in full meals. This isn’t unlike our usual breakfasts while at home – we opt to have more substantial plates at lunch and dinner. This allowed us to explore some of Portland’s best coffee houses, many which were located within walking distance of our hotel. Of course, on the weekend, we did also manage to fit in a few brunches!

Public Domain

Just down the street from our hotel, Public Domain was our first coffee stop. Sleek and modern, I really liked their open concept that emphasized the coffee bar. Seating wasn’t abundant, but it seemed like most took their drinks elsewhere.

Portland September 2012

Interior

Public Domain roasts their own coffee, which we enjoyed alongside a delicious cheddar bacon scone. We also took home a bag of their coffee for at-home consumption – always a great takeaway souvenir!

Portland September 2012

Counter seating

Barista

Barista’s downtown location was even smaller than Public Domain. And instead of offering their own line of coffee, they served several varieties roasted by different companies, the majority also based in Portland, including Stumptown, Counter Culture and Heart.

Portland September 2012

Interior

Barista only offered espresso and brewed coffee, and of the latter, one could choose the preparation method: French press, pour over or iced, with a different bean used in each (talk about attention to detail!). We ended up with a pour-over sourced from Kenya, roasted by San Francisco-based Sight Glass.

Portland September 2012

Beans!

Stumptown Coffee Roasters

Of all the coffee houses, we expected the most from Stumptown. It is easily the most well-known, and many of Portland’s restaurants serve their line of roasted coffees. We ended up in their Old Town location towards the end of our trip.

I haven’t seen Portlandia, but I would be shocked if the show didn’t poke fun at the masses of Mac users who set up for the day in Stumptown. It was a bit comical that the first image we were confronted with was a single row of thirty-somethings all typing away.

Portland September 2012

Interior

The cafe is equipped with a great up-to-date collection of specialty magazines, with multiple copies of each. We spent a bit of time unwinding there with our iced coffees (brewed to perfection), but we have to mention that the shop could have used a bit more care. Dust bunnies were rampant, and their bathrooms were in desperate need of attention. Given their reputation, our experience as a whole didn’t live up to expectations – it never is just about the food alone!

Portland September 2012

Window seat

Mother’s Bistro

Mother’s Bistro seemed to be a Portland institution. With a cookbook of recipes, and nary a time of day where they aren’t packed, it seemed like a good brunch choice.

Though the dining room seemed to be full to the brim, we were surprisingly seated within five minutes. I loved the chandelier light fixtures and the elegantly framed mirrors that added a touch of class to the room. But it wasn’t all glamour – the message on the back of the mugs reminded us to “call your mother”.

Portland September 2012

Interior

That said, my lasting memory of Mother’s isn’t of the decor or the service (which was friendly, but brisk) – instead, I have stomach pains when I think back to the portion sizes. Each plate, priced at under $10, could have easily fed two people! My apple-sausage scramble and Mack’s stuffed fritatta utterly defeated each of us.

Portland September 2012

Apple-sausage scramble

Portland September 2012

Stuffed frittata (the size of a dinner plate!)

Bijou Cafe

On our last day in Portland, we elected to stick close to our hotel, to make sure we wouldn’t be late for our departure. Bijou Cafe fit the bill, located only a few blocks away from our hotel, and had a reputation for a solid brunch featuring locally-sourced ingredients.

The interior was pretty basic, but was without pretention. And after the charming but cramped quarters of Mother’s, we appreciated the room to breathe.

Portland September 2012

Interior

My French toast was a bit too eggy for my taste, and after a bite of Mack’s chanterelle and gruyere-laced omlette, we knew his plate won the dish wars at our table.

Portland September 2012

French toast

Portland September 2012

Seasonal omelette (we loved that baguette was a bread option)

Service was personable and friendly, and the coffee refills kept coming. For a chill brunch, I would have no qualms recommending Bijou Cafe to visitors.

A Fruit Cafe: T.H.I.S. Place

Though I’ve made stumbling upon new restaurants a sort of pastime, I wouldn’t have come across T.H.I.S. Place unless someone pointed it out to me. Chris was the one who told me about this new cafe, located in a storefront in the Quest Building downtown on 105 Street and 104 Avenue.

T.H.I.S. Place

T.H.I.S. Place

Opened by the same family behind Lan’s Asian Grill, T.H.I.S. Place applies the same philosophies of wholesome, all-natural food popularized at the restaurant, but in a smaller scale, cafe format.

The interior is simple but modern, featuring art from local artists, and includes a small stage to host performers.

T.H.I.S. Place

Interior

Proprietor Tom Lim describes T.H.I.S. Place (which stands for “to be happy is simple”) as a fruit cafe. Not only can fresh squeezed lemonade be found on the menu, but also a variety of creative house-made popsicles, frozen yogurt and shaved ice. I tried a raspberry lemonade popsicle ($3), and was impressed by the intense fruit flavour and smooth texture. And yes, they will even be serving these through winter!

T.H.I.S. Place

Raspberry lemonade popsicle

Even if fruit is their forte, T.H.I.S. Place has a strong coffee and tea menu which includes five varieties of brewed coffee options (lattes are forthcoming), and five loose leaf teas. Their coffee is roasted by Abiamo (based in Rocky Mountain House), and is delivered fresh once a week. Mack tried an iced apricot peach tea, sweetened to his liking, and really enjoyed it.

T.H.I.S. Place

Iced tea

Tom says they will be tweaking the menu over the next few weeks (there is still space above the counter to add even more menu panels), so expect even more desserts and drinks. In the meantime, pay them a visit when you’re in the neighbourhood – whether you’re looking for some coffee or something sweet.

T.H.I.S. Place
10382 105 Street
Monday-Friday 7am-7pm, Saturday Noon-9pm, Sunday Noon-6pm

Now Open: Roast Coffeehouse and Wine Bar

I pass the Mercer Warehouse twice every day on my way to and from work, so I can’t tell you how much I have been looking forward to the opening of Roast Coffeehouse and Wine Bar (102, 10359 104 Street). Given the Starbucks at Quest on 105 Street closed a few months back, Roast is now the closest coffee shop to my office, handy for those days where an extra pick-me-up is needed. Having announced that their soft opening would be taking place today, Mack and I headed to Roast this morning before work.

Roast

Roast Coffeehouse

Mack loved the “R” sign marking the entrance, and the patio furniture that takes advantage of the Promenade’s wide walkways. He would have preferred that the benches faced the sidewalk instead of the street, but it is still better than no outdoor furniture!

Roast

Outdoor seating

No question, the space has been fully renovated. Mack had a chance to visit the space in January, and it looked nothing like it does now. The brick and floors had been painted over, and the strained, fluorescent lighting did nothing to highlight the character of the historical building.

Roast Coffee

Before

Until now: the owners of Roast did a great job – I loved the exposed brick and re-varnished floors, and thought the pressed tin was a nice touch as well. The space actually reminded me a lot of the newest location of Dark Horse in Toronto, right down to the chalkboard menu and the fact that they also had to open without an espresso machine.

Roast

After

The interior was warm and inviting, with a lot of different seating options, including booths that would suit large groups very well, and even a secluded community table.

Roast

Booths

Roast

Community table

Mack and I chose to have a brewed coffee each ($2.50 for a small). Roast serves California-based Verve Coffee, and had a good selection of their beans for sale. And though they didn’t have their espresso capabilities up and running yet, I love their fun take on lattes, with both a crème brule and maple bacon latte on the menu. You can take a look at their full drink menu here.

Roast

For the home brewing crowd

For food, Roast serves up pastries and desserts from The Good Oven (run by the people who had started Fresh Start Bistro, who then shifted their focus to catering) and lunch items from The Chopped Leaf. I have to say I’m a little disappointed that Roast didn’t choose to make any food in-house – given their competition is Credo (who bakes their own treats fresh daily) and Transcend (who has a rockin’ South American menu).

Roast

Salads

We didn’t get a full picture of their wine and evening menu, but it’ll be interesting to see how this evolves. The cafe + wine bar concept hasn’t taken off in Edmonton, and with Mercer Tavern next door, would those looking for a post-work drink choose Roast over the neighbouring bar? That said, if they create the right atmosphere (and it looks like they’ll be bringing in some live musicians at some point), perhaps they can cultivate that aspect of their business after all.

Roast

Interior

I’m excited that there is finally a business to anchor the other end of 104 Street, and look forward to coming back again! And with the Tavern opening up this weekend, it really is a great time to visit the Promenade.

Roast Coffeehouse and Wine Bar
102, 10359 104 Street
(780) 669-0221

Date Night: 124 Grand Market and Cococo Chocolatiers

Mack still hadn’t been to the 124 Grand Market, the current darling of the local food scene, so we decided to make it a date – why do dinner and a movie when you can do dinner at a market?

124 Grand Market

124 Grand Market

We hopped on a bus after work and joined the hoards gleefully enjoying another perfectly clear night out at the market (we joked with 124 organizer Kirsta Franke that this number of rain-free market days must be some sort of record).

124 Grand Market

Kirsta and roommate!

As expected, the seating area was jam packed for the dinner hour – Nomad and Drift had been mobbed early, and they were each already sold out of a few items (Mack and I kicked ourselves a little for missing Drift’s buttermilk fried chicken sandwich). Still, we were more than satisfied with a farm egg and pork belly sandwiches and a shared poutine.

124 Grand Market

Dinner time!

124 Grand Market

Mack loves egg sandwiches

124 Grand Market

Drift’s poutine with red wine beef gravy

One of the great things about farmers’ markets in Edmonton is the inevitability of running into someone you know! Among them tonight was the Walters family, who enjoyed the poutine as much as we did.

124 Grand Market

Michael, Kara and their sons

We didn’t buy much (not having our reusable bag really hindered my shopping impulse), but enjoyed perusing the vendors, especially those who don’t vend at the City Market. The first week out, there weren’t too many grocery vendors (meat, produce), but it would now be possible to fill one’s fridge quite nicely with their current mix.

124 Grand Market

Steve & Dan’s

124 Grand Market

Victoria Farm (they had some gorgeous kale)

124 Grand Market

Mojojojo Pickles (Jo’s turnip pickles are to die for!)

We did pick up a box of greens from Lactuca (grown in a yard just two blocks away from the market), and some doughnuts from Heritage Baked Goods – when else have you encountered a pink lemonade doughnut?

124 Grand Market

Heritage Baked Goods

As we watched the crowds go by, Mack and I tried to find out the reasons why this market has taken on such a life of its own so early on (especially given there are a number of long-standing Thursday evening markets, as well as newer ones). Is it 124th’s proximity to downtown or to Oliver, Edmonton’s most populous neighbourhood? The eclectic mix of farmers, handmade goods and prepared foods? The food trucks? The thoughtful marketing and publicity? Or its location on Edmonton’s up-and-coming street, anchored by hip tenants Duchess and Cafe Tiramisu? Regardless of the reason, Kirsta has definitely made the 124 Grand Market the place to be! Between the food and good selection of vendors, it’ll be worth your while to check it out yourself.

After the market, we walked over to Cococo Chocolatiers (the rebranded company that purchased Bernard Callebeaut out of receivership). They relocated a block south into the old McElheran’s discounted furniture storeroom at 10103 124 Street, and have transformed the unremarkable space into a bright and appealing retreat.

Cococo

Cococo Chocolatiers

We weren’t too interested in chocolate today, but there’s no doubt on another occasion we would take the time to look through the vast display cases. Instead, we made a beeline for the gelato, which in my opinion is among the best in the city.

Cococo

Refreshing raspberry gelato

We opted to cool off in the air-conditioned space, but some patrons enjoyed their treats outdoors on Cococo’s limited patio. With such a vast (and unnecessarily large) parking lot, I hope Cococo considers expanding their outdoor seating with a proper, attractive patio. It definitely would help grab the attention of passersby – at the moment, the signage is small and it isn’t clear a chocolate oasis awaits within.

Comfortably cooler, Mack and I decided to walk home, enjoying the evening breeze. All in all, a great date night – thanks, Mack!

Calgary Food Recaplets

One day, I might catch up on all of the back posts I intend to write…but I’m not there yet. Here are a few of the food-related places Mack and I checked out while in Calgary a few months back that didn’t fit into my previous posts.

Kingsland Farmers’ Market

Though I know our own farmers’ market scene has its own share of politics, the fact that Calgary’s ups and downs has played out in the public eye made it all the more intriguing to me as a non-resident. When I read that several vendors were breaking free from the Calgary Farmers’ Market to start their own (what has become the Kingsland Farmers’ Market), I knew checking it out would be at the top of our Calgary to-do list. Mary Ellen of Greens, Eggs and Ham has been selling at Kingsland for a number of months now, and has been providing us with updates along the way, so it was even better to be able to see it in person.

Kingsland Farmers' Market

Kingsland Farmers’ Market

It’s another Calgary market that is open on multiple days – Thursday to Sunday. Most of the vendors seemed to have permanent stalls, selling everything from produce to meat to wine and prepared food.

Kingsland Farmers' Market

Interior

It was a decent space, a converted car dealership, with high ceilings accented by nice wooden beams. With the large number of hot food vendors, it was great that the farmers’ market also had a large, bright seating area set aside – I can imagine friends meeting up for a bite to eat at the market, which would be a great draw for those not necessarily looking to shop. The same area also housed craft vendors – separation much appreciated by those just looking to do their grocery shopping.

Kingsland Farmers' Market

Greens, Eggs and Ham

Like the Calgary Farmers’ Market, the Kingsland Market also allows the sale of imported produce. Mary Ellen told us that they operate on the bullseye diet – goods that can’t be sourced locally can be brought in from elsewhere. She commented that Calgarians seem to prefer the “one-stop shop” farmers’ market.

Kingsland Farmers' Market

The tropical fruit table

We didn’t want to buy too much, given we would be in Calgary for a few more days without cold storage options, but we did pick up a bag of pretzel buns from Rustic Sourdough Bakery (they were miles above the pretzel bun we had at Loungeburger), plus two cute “pies on a stick” from Sugar Pie Bakery. What can’t be served on a stick these days?

Kingsland Farmers' Market

Pretzel buns

Kingsland Farmers' Market

Sugar Pie Bakery

Phil & Sebastian at Chinook Centre

I’m not sure I ever considered the possibility of one of the third wave darlings like Transcend or Credo ever setting up shop in one of our major shopping complexes, but after stumbling upon Phil & Sebastian in Chinook Centre, I’m wondering if that day might be closer than we think.

Phil & Sebastian

Phil & Sebastian

Open since September, the Phil & Sebastian is located in the newest wing of Chinook, but is also accessible from a street entrance. It was absolutely hopping, with many patrons (like us) stopping by for a caffeine boost to break up an afternoon of shopping, but it seemed many others were oblivious to the mall’s connection.

Phil & Sebastian

Interior

We loved the design, with the central coffee bar dominating the space, an open invitation for patrons to watch their coffee being made, and to interact with the baristas.

Coppeneur

The space vacated by Kismet on Stephen Avenue has been turned into a charming chocolate shop. Coppeneur is a micro-batch bean-to-bar chocolate maker, based in Germany (some of their products are carried by Kerstin’s Chocolates in Edmonton). This is their first retail location in North America.

Coppeneur

Coppeneur

I always enjoy browsing for chocolate, and this occasion was no exception. We picked up a mixed package of their cuvee bars, which were almost too beautiful to consume – barks of dark, milk or white chocolate studded with everything from almonds to cocoa nibs to pink peppercorns. Worth a visit – particularly because they were one of the few storefronts downtown actually open on a Sunday!

Coppeneur

Cuvee bars

Spoon Me

The cheekily named Spoon Me is a frozen yogurt chain with twenty locations in the U.S., and two locations in Calgary. We stopped in for a snack at the Kensington branch just before heading back to Edmonton.

It was a delightful space to spend some time in, bursting with natural light, bright wall colours, and funky furniture. The bathroom walls were decorated with decals playing off their name, such as “May the spoon be with you!” and “You can’t handle the spoon!”. The fun continued with their fill-in-the-blank napkins.

Spoon Me

Frozen yogurt treat

At $5 for a small (with three toppings), it was on par with other frozen yogurt bars, but between the interior and the laugh we had reading through some of the napkins pinned up to the wall, it was well worth it.

Spoon Me

And it just keeps on growing…

I really appreciate that such a lovely food city is only a few hours from us – and though we share many similarities with Calgary, it always feels a bit like a world away. I’m looking forward to our next trip down already!

Downtown Expansion: Transcend Jasper Avenue

This guest post was written by Mack, an Edmonton-based geek who fancies himself a part-time foodie. You can find him online at his blog, and on Twitter.

Tonight Transcend Coffee held a friends and family soft launch at its new downtown location at 10349 Jasper Avenue. I stopped by to check out the new space, formerly occupied by Axis Café. The space is largely the same, though it did receive a new paint job and some Transcend-specific touches such as the lovely artwork. The new fireplace on the second level is a welcome addition too.

Transcend Jasper Avenue
Entering the café.

Transcend Jasper Avenue
Looking down from the second level.

The new location offers a similar drinks menu to other Transcend locations, but will also feature “a small selection of remarkable beer and wine” beginning this spring. Transcend Jasper will also introduce an expanded hot food menu at that time, featuring made-in-house South American street food created by Chad Moss, who is a Red Seal chef.

Transcend Jasper Avenue
The boardroom upstairs.

Transcend Jasper Avenue
The basement space.

The boardroom that was available at Axis remains open for rental at Transcend after receiving some upgrades. It contains a large board table, a high-resolution projector and screen, and flip chart paper and other resources. Rates start at $20 per hour or $100 for the day. Transcend Jasper also has a great space in the basement – they are exploring various concepts for it, including a live-music program. Stay tuned for details on that.

Transcend Jasper Avenue
Yum, Transcend-roasted coffee beans!

Transcend Jasper Avenue
Putting up the sign outside!

The crew pictured above was putting up the sign as a I left the space tonight around 6pm, so like all good openings Transcend Jasper was down to the wire! It’ll be open for regular business starting tomorrow morning at 7:30am. You can follow the new location on Twitter at @TranscendJasper. You can see a few more photos of the space here.

Join me in welcoming Transcend to Edmonton’s new coffee district!